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Adv10_Research_and_Debate_Project-2-1-2.pdf

Adv10_Research_and_Debate_Project-2-1-2.pdf

Research Project: Persuasive Research Paper and Debate

Students will be given a topic in which they will conduct extensive research to debate the pros and cons of the given

topic. This research project is the major unit for the third quarter. Four test grades will come from the entire unit: 1)

note cards, 2) persuasive research paper, 3) MLA format test, 4) debate. There will be additional quizzes and class work

grades associated with the research unit.

Part I: Note Cards (100 points, test grade)

1. Students will turn in 20 note cards (individually) in which they provide researched information (statistics, quotes,

facts, etc.). The back of the index card will have the correct MLA format for citing the source. Note cards must be

labeled and sources identified. Remember, different sources will have different formats for the citation – a

good source for MLA format is Purdue Owl: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

2. After the note cards have been turned in they will be returned to the student to complete a two-page

persuasive research paper (individually) on their topic. Paper must include a minimum of three (3) parenthetical

citations and a Works Cited page.

3. Examples of note cards:

Front of index card: Back of index card:

Please Note: you may paraphrase information for the front of your notecard. However, you must paraphrase

CORRECTLY. Review the following examples of appropriate and inappropriate paraphrasing (i.e. plagiarizing).

The Original Passage (from Perdue OWL):

Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final

[research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore,

you should strive to limit the amount of extract transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester James D.

Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47.

A Legitimate Paraphrase:

In research papers students often quote excessively, failing to keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the

problem usually originates during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 46-47).

2A

“27% of middle school students werefound

to be overweight andphysically unable to do

what studentscould do ten years ago.

Verrochi, Lisa Page 117

1A

Franklin, Amanda. “10 Tips on Writing the Living Web.” A List Apart: For People Who Make Websites, 16 Aug. 2002, alistapart.com/article/writeliving. Accessed 4 May 2009.

1B

“27% of middle school students w found to

be overweight and physically unable to do

what stud could do ten years ago.”

Nelson, Thomas Page 49

1A

“27% of middle school students were found

to be overweight and physically unable to

do what students could do ten years ago”

(Franklin 27).

A Plagiarized Version:

Students often use too many director quotations when they take notes, resulting in too many of them in the final

research paper. In fact, probably only about 10% of the final copy should consist of directly quoted material. So it is

important to limit the amount of source material copied while taking notes.

Example of an In-Text Citation (AKA Parenthetical Citation):

Human beings have been described as “symbol-using animals” (Dean 3). We see so many global warming hotspots in

North America likely because this region has “more readily accessible climatic data and more comprehensive programs

to monitor and study environmental change” (“After Kyoto: Alternative Mechanisms to Control Global Warming”).

Romantic poetry is characterized by the “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” (Ebert 263).

Example of a Works Cited:

Works Cited

“After Kyoto: Alternative Mechanisms to Control Global Warming.” American Economic Review, vol. 96, no. 2, 2006, pp.

31-34.

An Inconvenient Truth. Dir. Davis Guggenheim. Al Gore, Billy West. Paramount, 2006. DVD.

“Blueprint Lays Out Clear Path for Climate Action.” Environmental Defense Fund. Environmental Defense Fund, 8 May

2007, www.environmentaldefensefund.com. Accessed 24 May 2009.

Clinton, Bill. Interview by Andrew C. Revkin. “Clinton on Climate Change.” New York Times, May 2007,

www.newyorktimes.com/clinton-on-climate-change. Accessed 25 May 2009.

Dean, Cornelia. “Executive on a Mission: Saving the Planet.” The New York Times, 22 May 2007,

www.nytimes.com/2007/05/22/science/earth/22ander.html?_r=0. Accessed 29 May 2019.

Ebert, Roger. “Review of An Inconvenient Truth,” directed by Davis Guggenheim. Ebert Digital LLC, 1 June 2006,

www.rogerebert.com/reviews/an-inconvenient-truth-2006. Accessed 15 June 2019.

“Four Season Maidens” Roman Marble Statue. 2007. Sculpture. Amlink Marble, Ypsilanti,

www.amlinkmarble.com/statue.htm. Accessed 4 Jan 2012.

Internet Source Evaluation Checklist

Use the following information to check the validity of internet sources.

Site Is the site an .edu, .org, .gov, or .mil site? These are most reliable and maintained by

colleges and universities, professional organizations, the military, and governmental

agencies. Be cautious of .com or commercial sites.

Author Is the author well-known, expert, qualified? Is there an association with an

established, recognized institution?

Publisher Is the publisher an establishment such as a university, professional organization,

government agency, or well-known publisher? Be careful of publishers that exist only

on the Web. Check these judiciously. Find out who they are and their qualifications

to publish on the subject.

Links Do hypertext links take you to educational or other solid sites which can lead to

further reliable research and not to commercial sites?

Bibliography Is there a bibliography which attests to scholarship and leads to quality sources?

Currency Is the information current with recent publication date? Internet documents are

frequently updated. Look for the date the material was last updated.

Point of View Are facts rather than opinion presented? Much on the internet is highly opinionated

without grounding in fact. Is the author’s point of view clear and supported by facts?

Is the author’s purpose to persuade, explain, or inform? Is the source a political,

activist, or commercial lobby whose goal is to influence public opinion and

legislation?

Audience Is information intended for mature, serious readers? Reject material that is frivolous

or chatty.

Part II: Persuasive Research Paper (100 points, test grade)

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: The Basics

The first step in learning how to write a persuasive essay is learning the fundamental rules of persuasive writing:

1. You MUST take a stand: persuasive writing has no room for wishy-washy declarations. Take a stand.

a. Bad: The DH rule in baseball has good and bad aspects.

b. Good: Both the American and national leagues should adopt the DH rule.

2. Write on a topic about which you are familiar

3. The topic should be something upon which there is a reasonable difference of opinion

a. Bad: Murder is bad.

b. Good: The death penalty is not the solution to end murder.

4. As with all essay writing, persuasive writing must include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. How you

arrange material within these three sections depends on your audience.

5. Knowing your audience is more crucial in persuasive writing than any other type of essay

6. Know your purpose. Are you trying to change the readers’ minds? Are you simply attempting to get someone to

see things from a different vantage point? Are you trying to make people act?

7. Provide evidence, explanations, comments, logic, and supporting details to support your claims

8. Know your audience. Know your purpose.

9. Use appropriate language and tone for your audience

10. Strengthen your argument by acknowledging opposing views and explaining why your position is better.

11. Use active voice.

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Organization

When learning how to write a persuasive essay, remember that how you organize your persuasive writing is just as

important as what you put in it. Follow these suggestions for organization:

1. Take a direct approach when writing to an audience that likely agrees with your position

2. Take an indirect approach when writing to an audience that is hostile or disagreeable to your position

3. Take an indirect approach when delivering bad news

4. Adapt standard essay organization to suit your audience and purpose:

a. The introduction announces the topic. If you’re taking a direct approach, state your purpose as well.

b. Include the background and context to help readers understand the issue. Explain the significance of the

topic. Whether or not to include background information as part of your introductory paragraph or as a

separate paragraph depends on the length of the essay.

c. Present the argument. Present your assertion first followed by evidence.

d. Acknowledge opposing views. Refute weaknesses in the opposing views. Discuss why your reasons are

better than the opposing reasons. If you wish to take an indirect approach, you may want to

acknowledge the opposing views before presenting your argument.

e. Conclude. Your conclusion should include recommendations and reassert your main argument.

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: Thesis Statements

 A thesis statement presents your opinions or thoughts on a subject or an issue. You cannot write an essay

without one.

 A thesis statement must contain a subject and an opinion

 A thesis statement answers the topic question (the one you created or the one presented to you by the

instructor)

 TIP: a thesis statement should never contain the following: in my opinion, I think, I feel, I believe, etc.

 A good thesis statement is short and simple: it should be no longer than one sentence, regardless of essay

length.

o Bad: In a world full of success gurus and books about success, it becomes ever so more important to

delineate the one trait that ultimately determines success: doing the right things consistently.

o Good: Success is a result of doing the right things consistently.

 A good thesis statement is limted to one main idea.

o Bad: The key to successful dieting is focusing on a specific goal, which is also the key to successfully

running a business and coaching a football team.

o Good: The key to successful dieting is focusing on a specific goal.

 A good thesis statement is a declarative sentence with no qualifiers (might, maybe, perhaps, etc.):

o Bad: Does Lebron James’s ability to score, pass, and rebound make him the league’s most valuable

player?

o Good: Lebron James’s ability to score, pass, and rebound makes him the league’s most valuable player.

Types of Arguments for a Persuasive Research Paper

 Religion

 Cultural

 Legal

 Historical

 Moral

 Educational

 Medical/Scientific

 Economical

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: An Outline – Version 1

Thesis statement: ___________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

I. Introductory Statement: broad statement to lead your reader into your essay

a. Brief history

b. Definition

c. Clarifying the problem

d. Thesis statement (Eg. For moral, legal, and religious reasons, violence in the media has a negative effect

on society.)

II. First Argument Introductory Statement (Eg. For moral reasons, violence in the media should not be allowed.)

a. Opposing view (Eg. Some people believe that violence in the media has no effect on people’s behavior.)

b. Your view (Eg. However, violence in the media has a great impact on how people behave.)

c. Reason one supporting your view

d. Reason two supporting your view Evidence and commentary throughout

e. Reason three supporting your view

f. Concluding/transition sentence

III. Second Argument Introductory Statement

a. Opposing view

b. Your view

c. Reason one

d. Reason two Evidence and commentary throughout

e. Reason three

f. Concluding/transition sentence

IV. Third Argument Introductory Statement

a. Opposing view

b. Your view

c. Reason one

d. Reason two Evidence and commentary throughout

e. Reason three

f. Concluding/transition sentence

V. Concluding Statements

a. Bring your paper to a close without repeating anything. Your voice should be heard. This is not a place

to simply summarize.

b. Answer the “so what?” question

i. Reasons for hope

ii. Individual responsibilities

iii. Collective responsibilities

c. Concluding statement needs to make your reading think about your topic – but do not end with a

question. You need a strong, definitive statement.

How to Write a Persuasive Essay: An Outline – Version 2

Thesis statement: ___________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

I. Introductory Statement: broad statement to lead your reader into your essay

a. Brief history

b. Definition

c. Clarifying the problem

d. Thesis statement (Eg. For moral, legal, and religious reasons, violence in the media has a negative effect

on society.)

II. First Argument Introductory Statement (Eg. For moral reasons, violence in the media should not be allowed.)

a. Your view

b. Reason one supporting your view

c. Reason two supporting your view Evidence and commentary throughout

d. Reason three supporting your view

e. Concluding/transition sentence

III. Second Argument Introductory Statement

a. Your view

b. Reason one

c. Reason two Evidence and commentary throughout

d. Reason three

e. Concluding/transition sentence

IV. Opposing View Introductory Statement

a. Reason one for the opposing view – negate

b. Reason two for the opposing view – negate Evidence and commentary throughout

c. Reason three for the opposing view – negate

d. Concluding/transition sentence

V. Concluding Statements

a. Bring your paper to a close without repeating anything. Your voice should be heard. This is not a place

to simply summarize.

b. Answer the “so what?” question

i. Reasons for hope

ii. Individual responsibilities

iii. Collective responsibilities

c. Concluding statement needs to make your reading think about your topic – but do not end with a

question. You need a strong, definitive statement.

Persuasive Essay Checklist

Organization and Clarity: Does this essay have the following: Not Yet Yes

A hook? Does it provide interest for the reader?

Thesis statement: does this statement clearly state the writer’s position and

provide a clear focus of the essay?

Transition sentence that clearly flow from one paragraph to the next?

Restatement of thesis/major argument in the concluding paragraph.

Formal language addressing an audience with the intent to persuade.

Importance of Information: Does the essay… Not Yet Yes

Supply a least two pieces of evidence in each body paragraph to support

position? (facts, statistics, quotes, etc.)

Is evidence relevant and accurately supports defending position? Does the topic

have two sides? What is the opposing view point?

Does the writer clearly state and support position?

Does the writer waiver on topic? Explain where this occurs in the essay.

Is opposing view point addressed and is rebuttal effective?

Does the paper contain specific evidence of the use of appeals (ethos, pathos,

logos)?

Formatting: Not Yet Yes

Formatting guidelines are met (Font: 12, Times New Roman, 1” margins,

headings, title page, MLA format: Works Cited and parenthetical citations).

Guidelines are met that follow the writing mechanics guidelines.

Mechanics: Not Yet Yes

Grammar, punctuation, and spelling are clear and correct.

Research Paper Rubric

100 89 76 65

Content &

Focus

25

 Exceptionally clear, focused,

interesting thesis

 Strong, rich supporting

details and examples that

prove thesis

 A meaningful conclusion

explaining the importance of

the research and how it can

be use

23

 Clear thesis which maintains

a consistent focus from

beginning to end

 Specific supporting details

are present

 A clear conclusion as to why

the research is important

20

 Contains thesis but with

inconsistent focus

 Generalized supporting

details that prove thesis

 Conclusion tends to

summarize research

17

 Thesis statement lacks clarity

and focus

 Inadequate or missing

supporting details

 Missing or summarizing

conclusion

Organization

10

 Strong introduction and

conclusion

 Consistent and coherent

logical progression

 Uses clear and skillful

transition

9

 Clear introduction and

conclusion

 Illustrates some consistency

and shows some logical

progression

 Uses clear transitions

6

 Introduction and conclusion

are present but not clear

 Show some attempt of

consistency and order. Paper

shows attempt of transitions

between paragraphs

4

 Usable to clearly identify

introduction and conclusion

 Lack of consistency and order

 Paper shows little to no

attempt of transition

between paragraphs

Style

15

 Written in formal language

(avoids slang completely)

 Elaborate and colorful

language

 Consistently strong and

varied sentence structure

 Direct quotes support

student’s ideas

 Paper written in student’s

own words

12

 Majority of paper written in

formal language

 Language appropriate yo

topic

 Words convey intended

message

 Direct quotes support

student’s idea

 Majority of paper written in

student’s own words

10

 Some use of formal language

recognized; informal

language is dominant

 Most language is appropriate

to topic

 Able to get vague idea of

message

 Some parts of paper written

in student’s own words

8

 Paper frequently uses

informal language

 Language is not appropriate

to topic

 Message us unclear

 Majority of paper is

plagiarized

Sources/

Format

35

Follows MLA guidelines:

 Uses 3 or more cited sources

 Sources meet the guidelines

for types of sources

 All parenthetical

documentation is MLA

correct (author’s name, pg.

#)

 Works Cited page is MLA

correct

 All researched info is

documented

33

Follows MLA guidelines with

few exceptions:

 Uses 3 cited sources

 Sources meet the guidelines

for types of sources

 Few errors noted in

parenthetical documentation

 Majority of Works Cited page

is MLA correct

 Most research info is

documented

30

Inconsistent use of MLA

guidelines:

 Uses less than 3 cited

sources

 Majority of parenthetical

documentation done

incorrectly

 Random MLA documentation

 Rarely documents sources

28

Fails to follow MLA guidelines:

 Uses less than 3 cited

sources

 Little to no parenthetical

documentation

 Works Cited page is not

understandable

Conversation

15

Superior editing. Rarely makes

errors in the following areas:

 Spelling and mechanics

 Correct usage and grammar

12

Careful editing. Makes few

errors in the following areas:

 Spelling and mechanics

 Correct usage and grammar

10

Some evidence of editing:

 Extensive spelling and

grammatical errors

8

Poor editing:

 Spelling and grammatical

errors make it difficult to

read paper

Total: _______________

Part III: Lincoln-Douglas Style Partner Debate (100 points, test grade)

Two teams will be assigned per topic. One team will create an affirmative (aff) presentation while the other team will be

responsible for creating a negative (neg) presentation. Involvement by each student is required.

Debate Format:

1. Aff Construct: 4 minutes. The affirmative side gives their complete prepared case. They must provide an

introduction to their argument, give their main argument, and come to a logical conclusion.

2. Neg Construct: 4 minutes. The negative side gives their complete prepared case. They must provide an

introduction to their argument, give their main argument, and come to a logical conclusion.

3. Cross Examination: 3 minutes. All debaters on both sides get to take turns asking and answering questions

about their constructive.

4. Break: 5 minutes for everyone to discuss and polish rebuttal.

5. Aff Rebuttal: 4 minutes. The affirmative side attacks the negative’s case – making sure to attack each point

individually.

6. Neg Rebuttal: 4 minutes. The negative side attacks the affirmative’s case – making sure to attack each point

individually.

7. Break: 3 minutes for everyone to discuss and polish closing arguments.

8. Aff Closing: 2 minutes. The affirmative provides a compelling closing argument. This is the time to get

emotionally involved!! Tell us why we should vote for you!

9. Neg Closing: 2 minutes. The negative provides a compelling closing argument. This is the time to get emotionally

involved!! Tell us why we should vote for you!

Partners can break up the speaking parts however they would like, but all parties MUST speak during the debate.

How it Works

  1. Clіck оn the “Place оrder tab at the tоp menu оr “Order Nоw” іcоn at the bоttоm, and a new page wіll appear wіth an оrder fоrm tо be fіlled.
  2. Fіll іn yоur paper’s іnfоrmatіоn and clіck “PRІCE CALCULATІОN” at the bоttоm tо calculate yоur оrder prіce.
  3. Fіll іn yоur paper’s academіc level, deadlіne and the requіred number оf pages frоm the drоp-dоwn menus.
  4. Clіck “FІNAL STEP” tо enter yоur regіstratіоn detaіls and get an accоunt wіth us fоr recоrd keepіng.
  5. Clіck оn “PRОCEED TО CHECKОUT” at the bоttоm оf the page.
  6. Frоm there, the payment sectіоns wіll shоw, fоllоw the guіded payment prоcess, and yоur оrder wіll be avaіlable fоr оur wrіtіng team tо wоrk оn іt.

Nоte, оnce lоgged іntо yоur accоunt; yоu can clіck оn the “Pendіng” buttоn at the left sіdebar tо navіgate, make changes, make payments, add іnstructіоns оr uplоad fіles fоr the оrder created. e.g., оnce lоgged іn, clіck оn “Pendіng” and a “pay” оptіоn wіll appear оn the far rіght оf the оrder yоu created, clіck оn pay then clіck оn the “Checkоut” оptіоn at the next page that appears, and yоu wіll be able tо cоmplete the payment.

Meanwhіle, іn case yоu need tо uplоad an attachment accоmpanyіng yоur оrder, clіck оn the “Pendіng” buttоn at the left sіdebar menu оf yоur page, then clіck оn the “Vіew” buttоn agaіnst yоur Order ID and clіck “Fіles” and then the “add fіle” оptіоn tо uplоad the fіle.

Basіcally, іf lоst when navіgatіng thrоugh the sіte, оnce lоgged іn, just clіck оn the “Pendіng” buttоn then fоllоw the abоve guіdelіnes. оtherwіse, cоntact suppоrt thrоugh оur chat at the bоttоm rіght cоrner

NB

Payment Prоcess

By clіckіng ‘PRОCEED TО CHECKОUT’ yоu wіll be lоgged іn tо yоur accоunt autоmatіcally where yоu can vіew yоur оrder detaіls. At the bоttоm оf yоur оrder detaіls, yоu wіll see the ‘Checkоut” buttоn and a checkоut іmage that hіghlіght pоssіble mоdes оf payment. Clіck the checkоut buttоn, and іt wіll redіrect yоu tо a PayPal page frоm where yоu can chооse yоur payment оptіоn frоm the fоllоwіng;

  1. Pay wіth my PayPal accоunt‘– select thіs оptіоn іf yоu have a PayPal accоunt.
  2. Pay wіth a debіt оr credіt card’ or ‘Guest Checkout’ – select thіs оptіоn tо pay usіng yоur debіt оr credіt card іf yоu dоn’t have a PayPal accоunt.
  3. Dо nоt fоrget tо make payment sо that the оrder can be vіsіble tо оur experts/tutоrs/wrіters.

Regards,

Custоmer Suppоrt

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